by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on July 11th, 2016

​In 1 Sam. 17 we find the account of David and Goliath.  This is a familiar text which reveals David’s triumph over the Philistine champion. It is apparent that the armies of Israel had been challenged by this giant to send one man to represent God’s people in battle against him.  If the Israelite soldier won the battle the Philistines would become slaves to the nation of Israel.  However, if the Philistine champion won, then the children of Israel would become their slaves.  One of the risks for anyone who would represent Israel was the fact that Goliath stood over nine feet tall.  He had a bronze helmet on his head and wore a coat of scale armor of bronze weighing five thousand shekels, and a bronze javelin was slung on his back. His spear shaft was like a weaver’s rod, and its iron point weighed six hundred shekels. (1 Sam. 17:4-7)  The Bible confirms that the men of Israel were afraid of this giant.  As a result, no one took the initiative to fight against the Philistine champion.
 
Hindsight has shown us that David was sent by his father to check on his brothers. David, the Bible confirms, arrived just about the time Goliath came out to challenge the armies of Israel.  In fact, this had been going on for about 40 days without a response from anyone on the Lord’s side. Having read the account, we are aware that David ultimately accepted the challenge and defeated Goliath. We are also told that at this time the army of Israel engaged in battle.  David was used by God to bring about a victory for His people. In addition, David became famous because he not only defeated the giant, but did it at a young age with no formal battle training.  The only training that David had was from his faith in the Lord. He testified that God had delivered a lion and a bear into his hand while he was caring for his father’s sheep. By faith David concluded that the giant, Goliath, was no different than the lion or the bear. If God had given him victory over these beasts, He would surely give him victory over the Philistine champion.  History validates the faith of David as the children of Israel were delivered from the oppressive attack of the Philistines.
 
This epic battle between David and Goliath serves as an example of a greater battle that has been going on throughout the ages. This battle will always involve a struggle for authority although the ones in arms may be different. The battle for authority includes every human being. No one is exempt from this battle.  Rest assured that the enemies of life will come daily to challenge one or all to meet them in battle. Although these enemies of sin, sickness, lack, and deception – just to name a few – may seem huge in our eyes, we can be assured that our God has given us a champion as well. Like David, our champion was also sent by His Father to check up on us. It is quite possible that our Father realized that we were suffering the threats of the accuser and had failed to realize how faithful He had already been in our lives. It is no coincidence that when it seemed like all hope was lost, that there was no one who could step up and represent our cause before such a foe - that Jesus arrived just in time. He defeated Satan and caused his demonic army to flee. Be warned that this is a fight for authority.
 
Let us be clear that each one of us has authority. It was given to each of us at the beginning as dominion and now remains with us as faith. We must remind ourselves of the battles we have won by the help of our Father and also trust that He is able to give us the victories for the struggles that lie ahead. Like David, I encourage you to exercise your faith and believe that your current battle is no different from those of the past. Be reminded that if your God gave you victories in battles represented by lions and bears, He will also cause you to triumph over every Goliath that comes across your path. Let us rejoice that in spite of the fact that there will always be someone or something that will challenge our authority, our God will never fail to fight on our behalf or to stand in the gap for each of us. Jesus has already defeated the enemy! Let us follow Him into battle against our enemies because their giant has already been slain.

​​​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on June 5th, 2016

​According to Vines Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words, the word authority has gone through numerous meanings. First, it meant “to have leave or permission.” In this sense, authority was something that one had only as a result of someone else giving it to them.  Next, this word carried the meaning of being “endued.” Here one was acknowledged to have authority with the assumption that they were to be respected. Finally, authority was defined as “having the ability or strength to exercise power.” One must note that there has always been some confusion relating to authority verses power.  It is understood that power denotes “ability, force, strength, and might.” In a spiritual sense, this word signified “mighty works, mighty deeds, and miracles.”  However, the significant difference involving power is its meaning when defined “as absolute or unrestricted.” This definition is usually associated to God who alone is understood to have absolute or unrestricted power. Man does not have this kind of power.  It is generally accepted that more than often man’s use of power needs to be limited. Power has the ability to corrupt the one who has it regardless of the context in which it is expressed. Many men and women have been desperately challenged to not allow power to alter their identity and purpose in life.  In short, human beings need accountability when it comes to power.
 
Luke 22:25- 26 addresses this reality in the context of how power can corrupt men and women. “Jesus said to them, the kings of the Gentiles lord it over them; and those who exercise authority over them call themselves Benefactors. But you are not to be like that. Instead, the greatest among you should be like the youngest, and the one who rules like the one who serves.” The question that had arisen among the disciples of Jesus focused on “which of them was considered to be the greatest.” The point being identified here is that men seem to equate power with greatness.  The one who has power is also the one who is considered to be the greatest.  Jesus goes so far as to use the terminology that those who consider themselves powerful also lord this mentality over others. He continues by using the word benefactor when referring to the kings of the Gentiles. A benefactor is someone who helps others by giving money for their cause. Jesus emphatically states that His followers are not to be like these leaders. It is implied that even though they had the potential to help others, their use of their authority was motivated more for their own benefit as opposed to those in need. Light is also shed on the fact that these benefactors viewed themselves as rulers.
 
Biblically speaking, man has been given the right to exercise authority. But this right must come from someone else other than the one exercising it. In other words, there is always someone with more authority and ultimately one with more power.  The exercise of authority is always dependent on the power it is associated with. Put another way, the one with the power also dictates how that power is to be used or expressed. Thus, the one with power also dictates the purpose, or how their power is supposed to be used by those given the right or ability to represent it.  Jesus shares with His disciples how the Father intended for His power to be exercised by men. He emphasized that the exercise of power was never meant to make one greater than someone else. It is evident that men, then and now, struggled with authority because their motives often ran contrary to God’s purpose for sharing it with them. Like the kings of the Gentiles, many today abuse this God-given authority by taking advantage of the poor or less fortunate, or by simply forgetting about those in need.
 
Authority, by its very purpose, requires two. It must involve an understanding of its purpose. James 1:17 declares that “every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.”  God created mankind and gave to them dominion. Dominion is simply the right to represent God’s power using delegated authority. God intended for man to use His authority according to His purpose or will. Anyone who exercises authority without an awareness of the power behind it will most often abuse it. Even Jesus humbly acknowledged that “all authority in heaven and earth had been given to Him.” As a result, He commanded His followers to “go and make disciples of all nations” (Matt. 28:18-19). The ability of the followers to fulfill the command of Jesus requires a right relationship with the one who represents power as well as a commitment to the purpose for which He shared it with them. Authority will always require two! God and man must work together for the benefit of all mankind.

​​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on May 7th, 2016

​We live in a nation that believes we all have certain inalienable rights. This simply means that each man and woman possesses the privilege of somethings that cannot be taken away from them, cannot be surrendered, nor can it be given up. When people fail to realize their rights they are often times subjected to abuse. God has given to every human being spiritual rights that even the enemy cannot take away from them.  The only way the enemy can rob a person of his or her rights is by undermining their knowledge of what belongs to them. God has given to all mankind certain rights because without their knowledge of their inheritance in Christ they are not able to live life according to God’s plan. One of these rights is “authority.” God has given to every man and woman the right of dominion or the innate ability to walk in authority. However, the ruler of this world is determined to blind mankind to this spiritual right!
 
God is the ultimate source and possessor of all authority. It must be understood that some authority God reserves exclusively for Himself.  Luke records the words of Jesus which testify of this fact when he states: “It is not for you to know the times and the seasons which the Father has set by His own authority” (Acts 1:7). In contrast, the Father does share some authority with man. Matthew testifies to this truth in his Gospel, chapter 16, verses 18 and 19: “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” By making this statement Jesus implies a number of things. He imparts the vision for His church, but also reveals that it must be built and will come under attack. He also reveals that the source of attack will come from the gates of Hades. It must be understood that this will be a great battle and those who follow Him must have rights or weapons if they are to withstand the assault of the powers of darkness against the plan of His Father.
 
Matthew records this revelation for all believers.  Jesus has given to all who will follow Him the right of “authority.” God shares His power with man by giving him authority. He confirms this when He shares with His disciples the “keys to the Kingdom of Heaven.” Each believer must learn to use these keys because they are critical to his or her obedience and success in fulfilling the will of God for their lives. Every follower of Christ must learn the discipline of managing these keys so that they do not suffer defeat at the hands of the adversary.  Jesus promises that whatever is bound on earth will also be bound in heaven. The keys serve as the connection between the authority of the believer and the power of their God! However, the promises and power of God will never be realized by the believer without exercising authority. Every Christian must recognize that they have been given authority as a right.  It is not something they must pursue or find as though it were lost. Rather, authority comes with who they are or who they were created to be.  These keys belong to each believer because they are necessary to the fulfillment of every calling, critical to the acceptance of every sacrifice, and foundational to the endurance of every trial.
 
Authority is important! It is important because God is the source of it and man is to represent God in the earth by using it according to what the Father has willed. Authority is precious because God has shared it with mankind and men must always acknowledge that they are not the source of it.  Authority is important!  It is important because it is the treasure that Satan is after. The enemy will use anyone to obtain it, sacrifice all to own it, and destroy all who oppose him. This fact has already been validated by his attempt to murder Jesus. However, this same fact serves as the testimony to the validity of our authority. In the same way Jesus overcame the assault of the enemy, we have the victory in Christ over all the lies, schemes, and attacks of the enemy upon our lives. We only have to believe that authority is our right, not a privilege. Authority represents not just our ability to overcome sin, sickness, and even death, but more importantly it is a testimony to the reality that our God has all power and we are simply witnesses of that power for His glory. 

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on April 12th, 2016

​I am sure that you would agree with me that authority is an allusive thing. One day you seem to have it and the next day it appears to be gone.  Everyone is vying for authority, but no one seems to be able to control it. Authority is defined as: a) the power to give orders or make decisions, or b) the power or right to direct or control someone or something. Having read and meditated on these definitions one might conclude that something is lacking. For example, authority must be more than the power to make decisions. Rather, it must also denote what kind of decision one makes. If one makes the right decision, this represents ownership of authority.  However, if the decision made is the wrong decision, this may mean that one lacks authority and is under the influence of another. But regardless of these realities, the fact remains that there seems to be some link between power and authority.
 
Let us clarify this point. From the definition one might conclude that authority is the same as power. It is common today to think that if one has authority, they also have power. The second definition magnifies this point. Regardless of whether one uses power or authority, there is a marked difference between directing someone verses controlling someone. God never gave man the dominion over another human being.  Even after man had disobeyed God and fallen into sin, God did not give Adam rulership of Eve, but rulership over Eve. Gen. 3:16b states: “….Your desire (speaking of Eve) will be for your husband, and he will rule over you.” It is clear that the man, Adam, was not intended to rule the woman, Eve. In contrast, he was responsible for ruling over her, or maintaining order in the greater context of their relationship. This is a very important point and must not be taken lightly. When it comes to authority, many have confused it with power and the consequences have been devastating.
 
When God made man, He shared dominion with him, or the right to share authority with God. God did not give man power because God alone is power and understands the temptations that come with power. Satan tempted the woman with the promise of power! “For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” (Gen. 3:5) Mankind has always been trying to be like God, knowing what God knows. However, it is evident that man has not achieved this end. Both the man and the woman fell into sin as a result of their quest for power.  In the process they lost their authority. However, please note that God never lost His power! What was lost was the authority man had in sharing dominion with his Creator. Matthew, in his Gospel, testifies of the triumphant victory of Jesus following His resurrection from the dead. “Then Jesus came to them and said - all authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” Jesus said nothing of power.
 
I encourage you to meditate on this revelation because power was never in question. God still has all power and the resurrection of Jesus from the dead is but a testimony of that fact. What needed to be restored was the authority that had been lost to man. So Jesus came in the form of a man and accomplished what no man could have ever done. As a result, all authority in heaven and in earth was returned to Him. In other words, Jesus, representing mankind, was in a unique position to restore to all men and women what they had lost because of sin. This is why Jesus promised His followers that wherever they went and whatever they did, they now had the authority to do it in His name and He would be with them. When the question is raised: “Whose Authority Is It,” the answer is always the same. God has all power and man shares authority with God in Christ Jesus. We have this promise that “whatever we bind on earth (using our authority) will be bound in heaven (backed up by God’s power). Power has always belonged to God and authority was always meant to be shared with mankind.  May we never become confused about who authority really belongs to!

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on March 5th, 2016

​The Book of Beginnings testifies of the fact that authority was never meant to be a solo act. Gen. 1:26 says: “Then God said, Let us make man in our image, in our likeness, and let them rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air, over the livestock, over all the earth, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.”  In this one verse we are made aware of the how authority was originally meant to be exercised.  God did not even make man by Himself. Rather, He invoked the involvement of the Trinity, God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost.  Together, the Trinity created the man.  Together, the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost exercised their authority and the result was mankind.  Authority is best understood when it is exercised in unity.
 
It is understood that God has all power and that He is sovereign - which means that God can do anything but fail.  There is no limit to His power and nothing is impossible to Him.  Yet God, in all of His Glory, shared dominion with mankind, the man and the woman. God gave to the man and woman the authority to represent His presence in the earth and the responsibility to maintain His order as well. God did not have to share anything with His creation. However, God chose to give the man and woman dominion.  He had great expectations for both of them and desired that they would be a testimony by fulfilling His created purpose for them.  Like Him, the man and the woman would be responsible for exercising authority together. Of course, this would not be an easy thing to do, but God had already set the example for them.  God had already established the fact that authority was not meant to be a solo act.
 
God consistently reminds us of the benefits of working together.  He is committed to our understanding of the power of unity.  He reminds us that “two are better than one, because they have a good return for their work.” He continues: “If one falls down, his friend can help him up. But pity the man who falls and has no one to help him up.” (Eccl. 4:9-10)  These are practical benefits that are evidenced by those who have experienced trials alone, who attempted to walk in authority by themselves, but realized that they were better off when they had someone sharing authority with them.  We are admonished to do everything together with the end goal being walking in unity. If this lesson is not learned well, there can be devastating consequences.  No one will experience victory without the help of God and others. 
 
Jesus also recognized this principle and implemented it in His own leadership. Although He knew who He was and that He was in the earth to represent the Father in revealing the Kingdom of Heaven to those in the earth, He did not choose to do this alone.  Jesus called men to share this awesome responsibility with Him. He shared with them the divine responsibility of walking in Kingdom authority.  However, He made it clear that this would not be accomplished by any one person, but only by working together.  He sent them out in pairs to test not only their faith, but also their commitment to this spiritual principle of working together. We are challenged today to trust others to assist us in the work of the ministry. May we be reminded again and again that authority was never meant to be a solo act.  May we realize that authority always works best when two or more agree and trust God that His Word will accomplish the purpose for which it is sent.

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on February 6th, 2016

​The word, legacy, is a very important word.  It refers to “something (such as property or money) that is received from someone who has died.” In this sense, legacy is synonymous with the word inheritance. From this definition we tend to think from a natural perspective. However, Jesus died and left us not only an inheritance, but also a legacy.  This word may also refer to “something that happened in the past or that comes from someone in the past.”  It also can involve “something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor (one who has gone on before us) or from the past.”  Any of these definitions could be considered from a spiritual perspective and would challenge every one of us to ponder on what we have received from the past as part of our heritage.
 
If one were to seriously meditate on this idea of legacy, he or she would have to consider who has really influenced their lives and evaluate the difference it has made. Many of us have been blessed because we had grandparents and parents who spoke into our lives, took us to church, and emphasized the need for salvation—a personal relationship with Jesus!  Many of us were fortunate enough to be surrounded by family and extended family that served as examples and role models for us to follow.  Whether we realize it or not, having examples and role models is the first step in modeling and shaping lifestyles, beliefs, and vision for the next generation. Think seriously about the lack of examples and role models that many of the youth today lack. The results are devastating.  We are witnessing a detour from the paths our forefathers took simply because we have failed to transmit the values and truths of the past that mattered if children were to grow up understanding the values of self-worth and having an appreciation for family.
 
Proverbs 22:28 and 23:10 both remind us “not to remove the ancient boundaries set up by our forefathers.”  Our Heavenly Father always meant for mankind to have a legacy. He commanded parents to ensure that their children understood His Word and His promises concerning them. The Father’s will was that each generation would share the truths of the Word with the next generation. In the book of Judges there are a few times when authentic leadership was absent in Israel—no example or role models—to follow. It was during these seasons that no one in that current generation knew the Lord or the miraculous things He had done for their fathers and mothers; the result being that everyone did what was right in their own eyes. In addition, legacy was lost and the children drifted away from God and from His will because the relationships that their parents had was lost and the promises of the Father were forgotten.  This almost seems like the age in which we are living today.  It appears that this current generation has drifted from the Father and seeks to do whatever is right in their own eyes.
 
I must remind you that we, the church, recognize and appreciate our legacy.  God sent His Son into the world to die for our sins and to reconcile mankind back to Himself.  We know that the Word of God is true and His promises are sure. It is our great privilege to share this revelation with those who are lost, blinded, and deceived by the ruler of this world. We have the Good News and the Father’s will has not changed.  We are called to make disciples of all nations and that begins at home.  As we begin this New Year may we be so encouraged and inspired that we cannot wait to share our legacy with others that they might also know that they have an inheritance as well.

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on December 31st, 2015

​Paul writes to the church at Corinth these familiar words: “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has gone, the new has come.” In this one verse Paul contrast the old with the new and reveals that whatever is referenced as old is to pass away. The NIV of the Bible states specifically that “the old has gone.” As we begin another New Year I am amazed at how much of what represents the “old” in our lives and families still remains. Mounces Complete Expository of Old & New Testament Words refers to this word, old, in a number so ways. First, old meant “bearded” and referred to a man coming into adulthood and also to one who lived long.  In an age when people usually did not live long, becoming old was viewed as a blessing (Prov. 17:6). In this sense, old was to reflect maturity or the ability to overcome those things that consistently hindered one’s ability to experience true victory in Christ.  Metaphorically, this term referred to the enduring richness of the Word of God in contrast to the powerlessness of our old natures (Rom. 6:6).
 
Every individual is aware of his or her “old nature.” Spiritually speaking, this nature is corrupt and is the source of every act of disobedience and rebellion.  It is the old nature that has contaminated every person’s ability to walk in the fullness promised to them by God, the Father. It is the old nature that clings unrelentingly to a person’s life crippling their ability to change! I challenge each of us to seriously look at our lives as we begin this New Year and examine what things are being brought into another year that should have already gone away? If one is real, he or she would have to confess that the - old nature - still has control in some areas of their lives.  These are not new challenges, but represent “advantages of the enemy” that have become a deep-rooted part of our DNA.  Christ has not only called us to experience the death of old things in our lives, but to pursue new things in their place.  This is the root of the problem faced by most individuals—they desperately want to be free from the old strongholds in their lives, but have no vision of the new they are called to pursue, realize, or become.
 
The Bible confirms that “the new has come.” In other words, the ‘new promised by God’ is already a completed work.  It has already been accomplished in Christ. Jesus has made all things new.  As a result of His sinless life and victory over sin and death, nothing is the same. This should also include everyone who has put their trust in Him. The KJV of this verse reads this way: “Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is new creature; old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.” A literal interpretation of this verse implies that anyone who puts his or her trust in Christ is made a new creature. This means that whatever represented the old cannot remain because of the new relationship now established in Christ. Thus, the conclusion is made that “old things are passed away.” In the spirit, this is reality that Christ accomplished by His obedience and sacrifice on behalf of all mankind. The only thing left is for the believer to now experience the newness in all things that is theirs as a result of being in Christ – or putting their trust in Him. The vision is “for all things to become new.”
 
God’s will has not changed! Every human being can experience new life by believing in Christ as the only begotten Son of God. But this ‘new life’ was never limited to the experience of salvation – believing and accepting Jesus as your personal Lord and Savior. Rather, salvation was to be experienced in every part of a person’s life. Your thought life was to become new.  Your struggle with sin was to become new in that you were to experience victory and not defeat.  Your habits were to become new. You were to have new habits or habits that reflected obedience to Christ as opposed to old habits that caused you to fail and remain in bondage. You need a revelation. The old that you cling to or that clings to you literally prevents the new from becoming a reality in your life. You cannot have both the old and the new at the same time.  Like right and wrong, good or bad, obedience or disobedience, or light and darkness – they will not work together no matter how hard you try to make them.  In the beginning of this New Year, may you come to the realization that is not new, you must choose to let go of the old in order to experience the new. May the Word of God become your experience in 2016 – “the new has come.”

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on December 9th, 2015

​Luke 16:10-12 declares: “Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. (11) So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? (12) And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own? This word “trustworthy” is an interesting word. It simply implies the “the ability to be relied on to do or provide what is needed or right; or deserving of trust.” In this context, Jesus is speaking to His followers and shares with them the mentality of the Kingdom.  A Kingdom mentality differs greatly from the mentality of our day. There seems to be a stark difference because the tendency today is to place value on the wrong things.  Put another way, what is valuable to us today is not always as valuable to God. Many who heard Jesus were potentially shocked by his frankness.
 
Jesus infers that God is very picky about who He trust or who He entrusts things to. A king is always represented by those who dwell in his kingdom. The king must find those who he can rely on to ensure that he is not misrepresented. These usually are men and women who are close to the king and have had a relationship with him that has resulted in their sharing rulership responsibilities with him. Jesus is quite specific in His revelation of what this responsibility looks like. He immediately goes to the foundational challenge of whether an individual can handle operating with limited resources. However, His emphasis is not necessarily on the fact that the resources are limited, but whether or not the one representing the king can be trusted. If a man cannot be trusted with limited resources, how can he be trusted with much? Jesus uses the word honest and concludes that anyone who cannot be honest with a little will not be honest with much. The point being made is simply whether the person can live within his or her means regardless of how limited they might be. He touches on the heart of the matter which involves stewardship. One who is thankful to the king is content in whatever state he finds himself.
 
Jesus then moves to the next level of trustworthiness.  The question is whether or not His followers really know the difference between worldly wealth and true riches. This is a very pointed question but demands a response. For example, in this season of Christmas it is easy to become confused about what is really valuable. During this holiday season many spend their resources on things that they believe are important. This is not a bad thing, but Jesus exhorts one to consider the true riches of life. True riches represent those things that money cannot buy nor solve. True riches always reflect those things that are eternal or last even after they are gone. For example, family is absolutely important and we need to make sure that we don’t take our families for granted. This is a time when families can come together and show genuine appreciation for each other. This may well involve gifts, but this love and appreciation goes way beyond one day.
 
Finally, we are exhorted to be faithful with someone else’s property.  In the context of Christmas and family, I encourage each of us to be mindful of those family members who have not only gone before us, but also paved the way for us as well. They had great dreams for us and set standards for all the family members. It was their vision and heritage that we are a part of. If we are going to be faithful, let us not forget who we are or where we have come from. Let us be faithful in representing their love and support for family. May we realize that the greatest things of value are the relationships that we are a part of?  Let us commit to ensure that our spiritual foundation is sure and that Jesus is the center of our celebration.  God has entrusted to us a sacred responsibility of being a part of His family. .  Let us respond by placing the value on the right things in this holiday season.  I wish you all a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on November 9th, 2015

​Paul writes in Philippians 4:6, 7: “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”  It is amazing to me that more often than not success is always associated to consistency.  This is important because the world attempts to shape our mentalities by communicating everything in the context of seasons. Everyone realizes that the month of November is all about Thanksgiving. Of course, this spirit of commercialism means that Thanksgiving must be shared with Halloween and Christmas. If one were not careful, he or she might conclude that this is the only time to celebrate holidays—when their season comes.
 
However, Thanksgiving is truly more than a season.  It is more than a holiday that comes every November. Of course, Thanksgiving as a holiday provides the opportunity for families to come together and reflect on the blessings of God in their lives.  Thanksgiving hopefully brings families together allowing them to share love and appreciation for the grace of God upon their lives.  But thanksgiving is much more than a season or a holiday.  True thanksgiving cannot be contained to a season, a month, or a day.  True thanksgiving should occur daily regardless of the seasontt. God does not limit His blessings in our lives to a month or a day. The reality is that God blesses us each and every day. It might be said of God, our Father, that He has a lifestyle of blessing His own.
 
It is the will of God to bless His own. He is the sustainer of all creation.  He is the creator of everything and takes very seriously His promise to provide meeting every need in all creation. We are reminded that God provides for the just and the unjust.  He is committed to blessing all mankind whether the man blessed acknowledges Him or not.  Our challenge, as believers, is to not forget where our blessings come from - or to take God’s goodness in our lives for granted. In addition, it should be our priority to share with others that it is the Lord who has blessed them.  Even those who don’t know the Lord or acknowledge Him as the source of their blessings can know that they are blessed. Every individual can testify that they are not the one who is responsible for their own blessings.  It is the Lord that keeps us all from the tempter’s snare.
 
Paul, writing to the Colossians, reminds us that we are not to be anxious about anything. He continues by exhorting us to pray and petition God with thanksgiving.  Notice the priority Paul places on being thankful as we pray. He then concludes that this kind of prayer, with thanksgiving, will result in the one praying experiencing the peace of God which is able to keep his heart and mind in Christ Jesus.  Jesus taught His disciples to pray daily because He knew that each day they would need the blessings of God upon their lives if they were to fulfill His will for their lives. The same is true for us today.  We need God’s blessings in our lives so that we are able to do His will.  In order to accomplish this, we must have a lifestyle of thanksgiving. We must honor God daily thanking Him that in everything He is able to work it for our good.
 
Let us not wait until a holiday comes or another season arrives to express our thankfulness for His blessings in our lives. If the Lord meets our needs daily we also should thank Him each and every day.  This is a lifestyle of thanksgiving!

​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC

by Rev. Clarence V. Boyd Jr., Senior Pastor on October 6th, 2015

​Most everyone is familiar with Acts 1:8 “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” This verse reflects the moment in time when the Holy Spirit was poured out on the followers of Jesus and then on the masses gathered in Jerusalem. This verse infers that, first; the disciples of Jesus needed power.  They were being called to take the Gospel of the Good News to the entire world, but the world also included home which is, in this case, Jerusalem. It was in the city of Jerusalem that God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven heard in their own native language the truth about Jesus Christ, the only begotten of the Father. The end result of this day called Pentecost was the salvation of about three-thousand souls to the early church.
 
We must not overlook the point that the preaching of the Gospel began at home with those believers gathered in the upper room who each were filled with the Holy Spirit and empowered for service.  It is evident that God’s intention was to use these few men and women to change the world resulting in the manifestation of the Kingdom of Heaven in the earth.  History validates the fact that these men and women were used mightily by God and impacted the entire world in ways that have not been surpassed to this present time. However, it is also apparent that God wanted to begin this endeavor first at home in the city of Jerusalem.  Every move of God must have a point of origin.  What happens in Jerusalem became the foundation of what was destined to happen in neighboring regions and around the world.
 
In our present age one might assume that it would be easier to reach Jerusalem, home, versus Judea or the ends of the earth.  In New Testament times the call to take the Gospel to places other than Jerusalem might imply that these were the places where the Gospel had not been preached. Thus it is safe to assume that these populations represented people who were lost because they had never been exposed to the revelation of truth revealed in Jesus.  However, today we find that the ends of the earth have come to Jerusalem.  In other words, there is a greater need, if not an equal one, to take the Gospel to our homes or to our own cities of Jerusalem wherever that might be. We are witnessing unparalleled times where generations of youth have been exposed to the Gospel without any impact. Our cities and our nation are full of churches that are sharing the Good News and yet we don’t witness the results experienced in New Testament times.
 
In short, Jerusalem has changed.  It is no longer across the sea in some distant land or on some far away continent. Jerusalem has become our own homes and families and our own neighborhoods and cities.  We don’t need a long-term plan or a strategy for raising money to go abroad to reach the lost. In unbelievable numbers the lost have increased right in our back yard.  The church must acknowledge this reality and respond to it. The church must answer the initial calling to take the Gospel to those in their homes and families. Believers today cannot have a bigger burden for the lost far away as opposed to the lost in their own families. Some might support the idea that it is easier to witness to those who are lost in a distant place.  However, it really makes little or no difference whether one is lost in a distant land or at home.  The conclusion is still the same—both are lost!
 
If ever there was a moment in time when the church needs to concentrate on their own that time has come.  May we arise to the occasion and fulfill the Great Commission to make disciples of all men.

​​​​In His Service,

Dr. Clarence V. Boyd, Jr.
Senior Pastor, RRTEC